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Carluke High School

This celebration of the life that thrives in wetlands showcases the plants and wildlife of a raised bog, a wetland pool and wetland meadow. It carries a strong message about climate change too and the important role of our wetlands as carbon sinks.

This garden celebrates the biodiversity in various Scottish wetlands. The edges of a swampy pool become wetland bog and wetland meadow, bursting with wildlife. The sphagnum moss reminds us of the role of wetlands as important stores of carbon.

To the right is the original design sent in by pupils in the Eco-Committee at Carluke High School. They were inspired by World Wetlands Day to create their garden design celebrating the biodiversity and ecosystems of wetlands. 

In the middle of the garden is a pond, surrounded by a wetland meadow and a wetland bog. 

To the back of the garden is a wetland meadow full of plants like Meadowsweet, Reed Canary Grass, and ferns that depend on continuous rainfall to grow.

The front of the garden is a wetland bog that acts as a carbon sink to mitigate the effects of climate change.  In this area are Sphagnum Moss, Heather and Sedge. 

Pupils spent a lot of time learning about the different kinds of wildlife supported in each of the habitats in their garden. 

Around the pond is a water margin area home to Marsh Marigold and algae, perfect for frogs, insects and Kingfishers.

The back of the garden is made from a reclaimed pallet. Plastic bottles have been attached to the pallet to provide space for plants. There are birds and insects made from reused materials including a brilliant Kingfisher made from a milk jug. Can you spot the Otter hiding in the grass?

Wildlife made from reused materials

This Pocket Garden is a Wetland or Fresh Water Margin Garden.  These designs are inspired by the flowing water of a torrential mountain burn, the still waters of our lochs and lochans or Scotland's wetlands where the ground holds the water like a sponge in bogs, fens, marshes and wetland meadows.  Wetlands help to filter and clean our fresh water, reduce flooding and store huge amounts of carbon as well as supporting wildlife. For wetland wisdom look herehere and here.

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